Art from the Start

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So what is “Art from the Start”? Well, the name tells it’s own story really and it’s a course we have been offering at the Art Room on Rose Lane for some time now.
Paul has been delivering several sessions of it each week for increasingly full groups and recently the expansion of numbers, (largely by word of mouth) had given us the opportunity to offer a fourth weekly session.
We now run on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings with the new session on Monday afternoons, which I have been offered the chance to run. From my own experience I can only say it had already been profoundly rewarding in terms of how much confidence had grown in the last 4 weeks.
The group are extremely supportive and encouraging of each other’s work which makes the sessions really enjoyable for me as well as them. We have been covering a range of increasingly subtle ideas in paint and Paul and I get together each week to ensure that the sessions offered match in terms of content and quality. Our thinking here is that sessions are standardised across each week so if artists cannot attend one they always have the opportunity to catch up at another.
It has been so successful up to now that I wouldn’t altogether rule out an other session eventually being added!
Current work is still life and has been very rewarding. I really am excited to see how these artists handle the next challenges in art we are going to offer them. These could include drawing, print, collage and a host of other explorations. If you are interested in finding out more why not contact us and find a slot for yourself?
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Egg Heads

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It was all egg heads at Rose Lane Studio’s earlier today!

The first portrait class of 2019 kicked off with the use of hard-boiled eyes.

Snow failed to deter the portrait artist booked onto Siobhan Carmichael’ all-new, visionary workshop. Boiled eggs were marked with central axis’ and guidelines for eye’s, nose, mouth and ears. After some fast-paced warm-up sketches, a long focused study was undertaken.

A range of images, a variety of approaches and a great input of wisdom from the LIAS tutor.

Next portraiture class to be held on Friday the 1st March, again 10-12 am at the leafy, but probably no snow encased, Rose Lane Studios. The use of colour and pastels, in particular, to be introduced with an all-female model sitting.

To book email: carmichaelsiobhan@googlemail.com

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Why Embroider by Hand?

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Why Embroider by Hand?

In a timescape where machine embroidery is the mainstream and any hand necessity work can be outsourced to countries where the cost of living and wages are lower, why should we still embroider by hand?

Keeping haberdasheries in business

In an age where retailers are struggling to keep their heads above water is it not the best time to support the local sewing shop. Many factors including internet trading and forthcoming Brexit have led to retailers going into administration on a daily basis, the High Street is in trouble in a way it had never been before. Fabric shops are often independent traders and locally staffed, a larger percentage of the spend is returned to the local community. Get behind them!

A traditional Craft

Dating from Before Christ embroidery looks to have developed for mending techniques. Traditionally used to embellish the gowns of the Royals and the wealthy, equally a pleasurable pastime of Aristocratic ladies. A craft practice we must pass through the subsequent generations.

Easy and Fun

Easy, well it can be easy, but equally, it can be extremely complicated. Straight stitch leads to French knots, this goes forth to feather stitch, finishing with the anguish of lace lattice. As you master new stitches you embrace a sense of achievement like no other, ultimately it is fun.

Unique and Personal Creation

What you cannot get from a mass-produced artefact, the truly unique quality of the hand made. A stitch slightly to one side and a variation of tension which resonates from crafting by hand. One-offs which you and others will be in lust over. Artistry which can never be replaced by the machine and the mass production techniques embedded in contemporary culture.

Embroidery by Hand is here to stay!

https://liverpoolindependentartschool.wordpress.com/the-autumn-courses/

New at LIAS

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News at LIAS

This spring will see LIAS return to Rose Lane Studios with a collection of old favourites and brand-new workshops.

New courses for the Spring season at LIAS have been released, we have embroidery, print, an all-new Portraiture class in addition to some old favourites such as Art from the Start and life drawing held at Rose Lane Studios.

Embroidery from photography: the botanic Environment

This is a 4-week course where we explore the use of photography to create embroideries from Liverpool’s finish parks and green spaces. The course incorporated the use of stitches suitable for more organic subject matters. French knots, scroll and variations of the chain.

Tutor: Alison Little

Course Running Saturday 2-4pm

02/03/19 – 23/03/19

Cost £12 per session

All sessions held at 1 Rose Lane Studios.

info@littlere-makes.com

Contact for full details.

Print Club

Printmaking covering a range of basic print techniques such as mono-print, lino and collagraph.

Tutor: Tony O’Connell (TOC)

Course Running

Friday’s 2-5 PM

Sunday’s 2-5 PM

£15 per session

Art from the Start

A range of techniques covering everything from still life to landscape, suitable for beginners or those returning to Art.

Tutor: Tony O’Connell (TOC)

Course Running

A range of techniques covering everything from still life to landscape, suitable for beginners or those returning to Art.

Monday’s 1 – 3 PM

£8 per session

tocdorje@hotmail.com

Contact for full details.

All sessions held at 1 Rose Lane Studios

Portraiture

Portraiture has existed since Art began, initially reserved for those with wealth: the Royals and Nobility. Not until after the Renaissance, painters began to represent the ordinary man.

From February the 1st, LIAS tutor: Siobhan Carmichael will be offering portraiture classes on the first Friday of every month. The models will change per session and the setting will be Rose Lane Studios in the leafy suburbs of South Liverpool where Mossley Hill meets Allerton.

A great class in a wonderful location.

Tutor: Siobhan Carmichael

Course running 10-12 AM

Held from 01/02/19

£10 per session

carmichaelsiobhan@googlemail.com

Contact for full details.

Weekly Courses Held at Rose Lane Studios

Regular Weekly Courses 1 Rose Lane Studios

Art from the start, Mondays 10-12, 6;30-8:30 pm, Tuesdays 10-12

£8 per session

Course suitable for those starting out as artists.

Life Drawing, Tuesdays 1-3pm, Wednesdays 1-3 pm

£10 per session

All levels of experience welcome as one to one instruction is given in a friendly atmosphere.

Tutor: Paul Gatensby

Rose studios is a room in a beautiful 1840 Grade II listed building with its own car park.

Contact Paul at pg.sculpture@yahoo.co.uk or 07952 461209

 

 

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Introducing Portraiture

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Portraiture has existed since Art began, initially reserved for those with wealth: the Royals and Nobility. Not until after the Renaissance, painters began to represent the ordinary man.

From February the 1st, LIAS tutor: Siobhan Carmichael will be offering portraiture classes on the first Friday of every month. The models will change per session and the setting will be Rose Lane Studios in the leafy suburbs of South Liverpool where Mossley Hill meets Allerton.

A great class in a wonderful location.

First Class: Friday 01/02/19 10-12 am

Second Class: Friday 01/03/19 10-12 am

Only £10 per session.

Get in touch to book:
carmichaelsiobhan@googlemail.com

Creativity and Learning

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LIAS tutors express their thoughts on creativity and learing:

We should ask ourselves why we believe that one person is an artist and another isn’t. The usual answers are that we feel we ourselves “can’t draw” to make a naturalistic image like a photograph. (Usually because a poor quality teacher has told us this when we were younger and so we have felt discouraged and given up, thereby robbing ourselves of our ten thousand hours of practice. Early lack of encouragement can take on the harsh voice of our own internal critic and be the most damaging to our creativity. Learn to refute that inner voice and remember that all little ones draw when they get a chance just for play. They are not judging themselves or trying to value their efforts financially but are drawing and painting simply for fun. We can remember that our own creativity is also play. We should encourage kids who want to draw and paint and then use that same openness and encouragement for ourselves. We should think about playing and experimenting with materials and process rather than trying to make the perfect piece. That will take care of itself if we play enough. Two extremely important cannon artists best sum this philosophy up for me. The mighty Joseph Beuys said, “everyone is an artist” to embody that openness and the hugely important Pablo Picasso said, “ It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.” On his ongoing efforts to recapture his playfulness and creative innocence. It’s easy to take on negative comments and allow them to limit our creativity- the truth is negative comments about our creativity are only ever made by people who lack it themselves so do not have the relevance and liveliness of our own willingness to play, make a mess and make mistakes. It’s how we learn.

LIAS tutor Toc

Should the Department of Education decide to replace ‘The 3Rs’ with a new catchphrase, I have one they’ll be welcome to purchase.
It’s the acronym: D.R.A.W.
It stands for Drawing, Reading, Arithmetic and Writing. It has the twin advantages of (a), correct spelling, (‘rithmetic’ for heaven’s sake!), and, (b), including drawing as an essential skill for life.
Drawing begins with seeing. Then more seeing. To draw is to analyse and interpret, to get to know or wonder about your subject however modest it may appear at first. Suppose one draws a leaf. To draw a leaf is to marvel at its structure, wonder at how it attaches to the stem, and what those veins and cells are for and why is it a different colour on the underside. The same applies to a tree, a bridge a street, the human body and so on. You may be drawing the appearance of a thing but you’re discovering its spirit. So, should every child be taught to draw? Reword the question this way: should we deny any child the chance to wonder at the world?
Did I forget to mention it’s also great fun?

LIAS Tutor Paul Gatensby

 

Gallery Cleaner Mistakes Rubbish for Artwork

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By our investigative reporter Slias Yarner

A row has broken out about rubbish at cutting edge art venue the Greentrousers Gallery. Our source tells us that gallery cleaner, Mrs Maggie Gittens from Kirkdale, has refused to dump some bin bags full of rubbish as she considers them works of art.

Gallery director and radical curator, Mr Hans Upp, told our reporter, ‘I’ve been asking her for days now to take the bin bags out but all I get is gibberish.’

When asked for a statement Mrs Gittens told us, ‘These bin bags are a metaphor for our very existence. The contain the detritus of our lived experience in the form of the cast-off residue of the objects which we value. By choosing to designate them as rubbish we are alienating ourselves for the forces which formed us and leave ourselves vulnerable to nihilistic regression, now will you leave me alone while I’m tryna ‘ave a fag.’

When it was pointed out to her that the bags were starting to smell and there was a weird brown liquid seeping out all over the new laminate flooring she said, ‘This artworks straddles the line between the organic and the inorganic, the plastic membrane containing the inner world of organic transmutation; furthermore just as the human skin can puncture with the loss of vital life force so this trail inner fluids describes the life cycle of constant decay and rebirth and if you don’t mind I think I can hear my kettle boiling.’

Mr Upp, later stated, ‘I knew I should have given that job to one of my pals’